make a contribution, and you’ll get the better seat

Posted in Music with tags , , on August 13, 2017 by phanteana

just when i thought it wasn’t possible to love Ray Burton anymore than i already do, he makes another outstanding contribution to his son‘s legacy. time to break out the Kleenex and dust off that copy of Master Of Puppets.

i saw a tower, a man in black, and a gunslinger…

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , , , , on August 6, 2017 by phanteana

…and i will gladly see them all again. it was a long wait, but in the end it was worth it.

long live the King

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , on July 29, 2017 by phanteana

it seems 2017 is indeed the Year of Stephen King. with less than a week to go before The Dark Tower welcomes its visitors, the excitement (as well as the anxiety) is building up. i haven’t been THIS excited about a movie since, well…since the last time i took a trip to Middle-Earth. considering summer movie season is typically comprised of sequels and reboots, this is an anomaly all its own as an original piece of work with an unusually short run-time for Roland and Walter‘s epic showdown. obviously, there are plenty of people who are unfamiliar with King’s saga, so in order to prep them for it Rolling Stone has offered a listing of its backstory and what to expect (without revealing too much, of course).

Tower isn’t the only Stephen King adaptation making an appearance this year. The Mist is now a TV series, and coulrophobia will be on the rise once again when IT comes back to terrorize everyone who repressed nightmares of the 1990 mini-series. if y’all intend to see the latter, keep an eye out for an homage to Tim Curry…and maybe sleep with the lights on for awhile.

“you can’t stop what’s coming”

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , on July 19, 2017 by phanteana

it’s mid-July, so that usually means heatwaves and San Diego Comic-Con (which doubles as both a life-changing experience and an escape from the heat, since SD doesn’t seem to suffer from an overabundance of humidity). this year, mid-July has another association with it: only a few more weeks until The Dark Tower is released! it took 35 years to translate onto celluloid, but it’s finally (almost) here!

 

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since it’s taken roughly half of Stephen King’s lifetime to write the series and it’s always been viewed as the sole piece of his resume that was deemed implausible to film, it would seem logical to promote the long-awaited film adaptation as heavily as possible. but despite its status as a “summer blockbuster”, this Tower has largely kept its doors closed, and it’s likely due to maintaining the secrecy surrounding the project (it was in the dreaded Development Limbo for 10 years, after all). in addition, because its an epic story audiences expected a lengthy run time (you know…the kind where comfy clothes are required). but the British Board of Film Classification says a maiden voyage to Mid-World will take much less time than imagined. still, this is a place i’ve longed to visit for years and i’m excited that the opportunity has finally come.

magical manuscripts & spellbinding sources

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , , , on July 14, 2017 by phanteana

transcribing manuscripts is only one facet of an archival role. depending on the subject matter of what needs to be translated, the work involved can either make you look forward to setting your alarm early, or cause you to count down the minutes until lunch. in other words, work isn’t always meant to be fun (it is called work, after all)…but it can be, if you invoke the right frame of mind. the Newberry Library in Chicago has opened up a portion of its roughly 80,000 documents pertaining to religion for the public to transcribe, including a number of manuscripts dealing with the occult, bizarre healing remedies, witchcraft, and spell casting. the Newberry would love any assistance with this otherworldly project, so while you might want to brush up on how to call the corners, you don’t need a Ph.D to translate the materials. just be careful not to summon any demons; they’re known for not returning books on time.

 

 

Send(ak) in the clowns

Posted in Art & Photography, Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , , on July 10, 2017 by phanteana

there are plenty of authors, actors, musicians, etc. who have passed on yet they still manage to crank out bodies of work long after they’ve physically departed this world. JRRT released a best-selling book this year, despite the fact that he set sail for the Grey Havens in 1973. the more recently-deceased Maurice Sendak will also be publishing a new illustrated book set for next year…although, it’s not entirely new. it was actually conceived in 1990, but the manuscript was set aside and discovered when the author’s former assistant was sorting through Sendak’s papers following his death in 2012.

throughout his career, Maurice Sendak was no stranger to the infamous Banned Books List. several of his stories were deemed too disturbing for his target audience, but that didn’t seem to put a dent in his reputation. only time will tell if the new one, titled Presto & Zesto In Limboland, will be among those controversial classics.

Goth’s not dead…it’s just matured

Posted in Music, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , on July 5, 2017 by phanteana

despite its association with doom and gloom, Goth is alive and well…or at least is a little more mature. there was a time when Goth was considered youthful, with its “sleep all day, party all night, never grow old” mentality. but since most folks are not members of the Lost Boys they eventually get jobs, have families, pay mortgages, etc. but hey, we can still wear black and listen to Bauhaus!

so what’s the issue? lack of fresh blood (no pun intended). while it’s great that many folks who were teens and 20-somethings during the Goth heyday of the 80’s or the 90’s revival are still enjoying the music and managing to venture out to events when feasible, the younger generation just doesn’t seem to take much notice of it. one factor might be the economy…because let’s face it, having fun costs money. yet there are plenty of free or low-cost events taking place to alleviate this concern. another might be feeling out of place in a crowd full of 35 to 50-somethings who often reminisce about the good ol’ days. in addition, a lot of cities just aren’t hot beds for Goth as they used to be…Los Angeles and New Orleans are still going strong, as are Berlin & London. but places like New York have fallen behind in recent years, due to rising rents and declining attendance. still, those who are loyal will be around for many years to come.