Archive for the Library Science stuff Category

a rush and a push and the land is ours (to drive a bookmobile)

Posted in Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , on October 25, 2017 by phanteana

the bookmobile is both loved and ridiculed. it brings the joys of reading to people who may not otherwise have access to a library, but it also is prone to parodies. regardless of opinion, it is an invention that has helped libraries gain wider appeal.

while bookmobiles are more commonly associated with suburban and rural areas where libraries are either few and far between, major urban areas are also embracing them. one such city is Los Angeles and if you’re familiar with the layout of L.A., then you know commuting relies heavily on driving…sure, you can get around on the bus or rail (or by bike) but the trips will take far longer (and the L.A. highways are notorious for their congestion, frequently dubbed “Carmageddon“). so why spend 45 minutes driving to a bookstore, when the books can come to you? that’s the idea behind Twenty Stories, an independent bookmobile operating out of a 1987 Chevy van. the founders are a millennial couple from New York who relocated to L.A. last year in search of a literary community. while both cities have a rich amount of writers and bookstores, New York is the polar opposite of Los Angeles when it comes to getting around: despite a round-the-clock public transit system (good), it’s unfortunately prone to overcrowding and intense delays (bad)…so while getting around without a car may be easier, it isn’t always faster. so perhaps Twenty Stories might consider expanding its services in the future, especially since the creators once dwelt in The City That Never Has A Train Running On Time.

 

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happy Electronic Records Day! (or, “must have missed that email”)

Posted in Library Science stuff, Techie Stuff with tags , , , on October 11, 2017 by phanteana

time to ban some books (again)

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , , on September 27, 2017 by phanteana

are you still recovering from Banned Books Week 2016? well, get ready for yet another crop of frequently challenged books. and if there’s any literary pieces you think should be included in the list, please post them in the comments!

 

Banned Books Week: Our right to read, September 24-30, 2017

an unexpected (ok, not entirely) anniversary

Posted in Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , , , on September 21, 2017 by phanteana

long before i became a librarian, i visited plenty of libraries. i borrowed tons of books, even if i never finished all of them. but one which i took out frequently and always completed is one that has withstood the test of time. it has been translated into countless languages, beloved by literary critics, librarians and voracious readers everywhere, has has been beautifully displayed in art and film countless times, and today turns 80 years old…and to think, all this from a book whose central character was created while grading exams. happy anniversary, Bilbo Baggins!

 

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the greatest goths in literary history

Posted in Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , on August 31, 2017 by phanteana

even with Labor Day and the end of summer vacation approaching, the season doesn’t officially end until late September. so while the layers don’t have to be pulled out of storage just yet (especially if you’re in L.A. where September is chock full of heatwaves), the summer reading lists are wrapping up just in time for the school year (or the beginning of the fiscal year for some working folks). reading trends have changed over time, but one genre that has maintained consistency on teachers’ syllabuses is that of Gothic Literature (or, Goth Lit for short). you don’t necessarily have to be Goth to enjoy classics such as Frankenstein or Wuthering Heights, as these publications are universally acclaimed by a variety of readers.

where Goth Lit is concerned, most people often think of Mary Shelley or Edgar Allan Poe. yet there are plenty of other Great Goths in literary history, many of whom you wouldn’t expect to be even remotely linked to the term (save for Nick Cave, who is the only actual Goth on the list)…until you delve a little deeper into their works. you don’t have to wait until Halloween to read these authors, as their works can be accessed year-round. but if you feel the need to get into the spirit (even though it’s still shorts weather), grab a book and put on a classic Goth album of your choosing to enhance the experience.

 

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magical manuscripts & spellbinding sources

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , , , on July 14, 2017 by phanteana

transcribing manuscripts is only one facet of an archival role. depending on the subject matter of what needs to be translated, the work involved can either make you look forward to setting your alarm early, or cause you to count down the minutes until lunch. in other words, work isn’t always meant to be fun (it is called work, after all)…but it can be, if you invoke the right frame of mind. the Newberry Library in Chicago has opened up a portion of its roughly 80,000 documents pertaining to religion for the public to transcribe, including a number of manuscripts dealing with the occult, bizarre healing remedies, witchcraft, and spell casting. the Newberry would love any assistance with this otherworldly project, so while you might want to brush up on how to call the corners, you don’t need a Ph.D to translate the materials. just be careful not to summon any demons; they’re known for not returning books on time.

 

 

Send(ak) in the clowns

Posted in Art & Photography, Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , , on July 10, 2017 by phanteana

there are plenty of authors, actors, musicians, etc. who have passed on yet they still manage to crank out bodies of work long after they’ve physically departed this world. JRRT released a best-selling book this year, despite the fact that he set sail for the Grey Havens in 1973. the more recently-deceased Maurice Sendak will also be publishing a new illustrated book set for next year…although, it’s not entirely new. it was actually conceived in 1990, but the manuscript was set aside and discovered when the author’s former assistant was sorting through Sendak’s papers following his death in 2012.

throughout his career, Maurice Sendak was no stranger to the infamous Banned Books List. several of his stories were deemed too disturbing for his target audience, but that didn’t seem to put a dent in his reputation. only time will tell if the new one, titled Presto & Zesto In Limboland, will be among those controversial classics.