body slams and books

Posted in Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , on December 21, 2017 by phanteana

if you’ve read enough of this blog, then you’re aware of my professional leanings: i’m a media library coordinator with an interest in coding. i even have my own portfolio (but you won’t get to see that just yet, because that would mean revealing my identity…muhahaha!). but enough about me, let’s talk about…the Milwaukee Public Library. why them? because they, like so many other libraries, have found a unique way to entice patrons into spending more time in the stacks…even if it meant rearranging the furniture and computer stations.


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fandom and chill

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , , , , on December 11, 2017 by phanteana

we’ve now reached the point where year-in-review reports start to pile in. whether in the professional or personal world, everyone has a list of goals they achieved & areas they’d like to improve in. if you’re a major streaming service, then you take note of what your subscribers are watching and how often they do so. well, one Canadian subscriber seems to be quite devoted to Middle-Earth (it’s not me, because anyone who reads this knows i’m in the US…also, i don’t have an account with said streaming service). that’s dedication…and a whole lotta bathroom breaks.


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“you really need to get outside more”

remember December?

Posted in Art & Photography, Popular Culture with tags , , , on December 4, 2017 by phanteana

December just isn’t the same without a new Middle-Earth film. but at least the internet still has plenty of room for JRRT until that Amazon series/biopic gets underway.



over the river & through the woods to Saruman’s house we go

original sin(ger)

Posted in Music with tags , , , on November 22, 2017 by phanteana

Michael was the epitome of the charismatic front man: his voice, physical presence, and personality made him the Mick Jagger of the 80’s. he was special, whether he realized it or not. i never got to see INXS, and it remains one of the biggest regrets i could have. the proposed 20th anniversary tour, which Michael was rehearsing for at the time of his death, would have been my opportunity to see him in his true form. i never got that chance.

when we mourn artists we’ve never met, we don’t cry because we knew them. we cry because they helped us know ourselves.


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lights out for the Dark Universe

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , on November 8, 2017 by phanteana

although i have a background in Film Studies, i rarely go to the movie theater these days (unless it’s a second-run screening). my reasoning is a combination of financial (let’s face it, going to the movies isn’t cheap anymore… on top of that, if you’re going to pay $20 to talk/look at your phone while the film is showing, you might as well just stay home) and personal (a story has to really speak to me in order to grab my attention).

we’re still in 2017, but i saw a total of 4 new releases in the theater between February and September. that’s a rather low number, but i’m probably not alone; the offerings we’ve been getting over the years are remakes and franchises, and the repetition has caused most people to drop the multiplex to watch films on Amazon Prime for far less than they could if they got off the sofa.

despite the downturn in movie-attendance, there was an upswing for the Horror genre. once relegated to the Halloween season (plus the “dump” months of January & August), scary movies have conjured up a lot of success this year. it was even announced some time ago that a whole cinematic universe revolving around classic movie monsters was to be launched. unfortunately, that hasn’t exactly gone as planned* (The Mummy was not among the 4 films i saw this year, mostly because i’m just not into Tom Cruise flicks…except for the glory that is Legend). but the final nail hasn’t been hammered into the coffin just yet, so perhaps the Dark Universe will rise from its premature cutting room floor grave.


*while the writers at bloody-disgusting may not have liked Dracula Untold, i thought it was a wonderful film.




there and back again?

Posted in Popular Culture with tags , , , on November 4, 2017 by phanteana

now that Halloween has come and gone, we now roll into the time of year where the Tolkien trailers start pouring in…oh, wait a minute…there aren’t anymore Middle-Earth films…or so i thought…

just when i thought i wouldn’t ever be making a return trip to my favorite fictional land, there comes news of a TV series in the works. in addition, the first images from behind-the-scenes of the upcoming Tolkien biopic have surfaced online. the latter will obviously be grounded in reality as opposed to fiction, but it will still be interesting to see the life of the author played out onscreen. as for the former…i’m trying really hard to be excited about this, but i’m also EXTREMELY nervous. it took decades for the films to materialize, from acquiring the rights up until post-production. everything was riding on the fate of a then-unknown director whose only claims to fame were splatter films and a ghostly comedy starring Alex P. Keaton. but as we all know, said director proved EVERYONE wrong…the same has yet to be said for what’s to come.


music to die for: the story of Goth in 33 songs

Posted in Music, Popular Culture with tags , , , , on October 29, 2017 by phanteana

music lists compiled as a “history of [insert genre here]” are always interesting to read. some songs fit perfectly, while others appear to be a square peg in a round hole. the story of Goth has long been up for debate: who really started it, where did it begin, etc. these theories can go on for days in online discussion forums and on social media, and sometimes a resolution is nowhere in sight.

to join in the ongoing debate, Pitchfork put together “The Story Of Goth In 33 Songs” in an attempt to shed some light on the dark side of modern music. in addition, they conducted a phone interview with Peter Murphy, who is often viewed as one of Godfathers of Goth despite never fully aligning himself with the title. Murphy’s solo albums are less brooding than his work with Bauhaus and his two greatest influences were David Bowie and Iggy Pop (who were credited with inventing Glam Rock and Punk, respectively), but he never lost his eerie creative flair (thank goodness).

while i can’t say i’m familiar with the latter entries on the list (other than Fever Ray’s “If I Had A Heart“), the classics i know and love certainly reflect the story of Goth well. my only issue with this list is the lack of inclusion of “Paint In Black“, which is probably one of the best representations of Goth in its infancy (and paved the way for numerous covers by both Goth and non-Goth artists)…a job well done, Mick.