Archive for books

long live the King

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , on July 29, 2017 by phanteana

it seems 2017 is indeed the Year of Stephen King. with less than a week to go before The Dark Tower welcomes its visitors, the excitement (as well as the anxiety) is building up. i haven’t been THIS excited about a movie since, well…since the last time i took a trip to Middle-Earth. considering summer movie season is typically comprised of sequels and reboots, this is an anomaly all its own as an original piece of work with an unusually short run-time for Roland and Walter‘s epic showdown. obviously, there are plenty of people who are unfamiliar with King’s saga, so in order to prep them for it Rolling Stone has offered a listing of its backstory and what to expect (without revealing too much, of course).

Tower isn’t the only Stephen King adaptation making an appearance this year. The Mist is now a TV series, and coulrophobia will be on the rise once again when IT comes back to terrorize everyone who repressed nightmares of the 1990 mini-series. if y’all intend to see the latter, keep an eye out for an homage to Tim Curry…and maybe sleep with the lights on for awhile.

“you can’t stop what’s coming”

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , on July 19, 2017 by phanteana

it’s mid-July, so that usually means heatwaves and San Diego Comic-Con (which doubles as both a life-changing experience and an escape from the heat, since SD doesn’t seem to suffer from an overabundance of humidity). this year, mid-July has another association with it: only a few more weeks until The Dark Tower is released! it took 35 years to translate onto celluloid, but it’s finally (almost) here!

 

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since it’s taken roughly half of Stephen King’s lifetime to write the series and it’s always been viewed as the sole piece of his resume that was deemed implausible to film, it would seem logical to promote the long-awaited film adaptation as heavily as possible. but despite its status as a “summer blockbuster”, this Tower has largely kept its doors closed, and it’s likely due to maintaining the secrecy surrounding the project (it was in the dreaded Development Limbo for 10 years, after all). in addition, because its an epic story audiences expected a lengthy run time (you know…the kind where comfy clothes are required). but the British Board of Film Classification says a maiden voyage to Mid-World will take much less time than imagined. still, this is a place i’ve longed to visit for years and i’m excited that the opportunity has finally come.

Send(ak) in the clowns

Posted in Art & Photography, Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , , on July 10, 2017 by phanteana

there are plenty of authors, actors, musicians, etc. who have passed on yet they still manage to crank out bodies of work long after they’ve physically departed this world. JRRT released a best-selling book this year, despite the fact that he set sail for the Grey Havens in 1973. the more recently-deceased Maurice Sendak will also be publishing a new illustrated book set for next year…although, it’s not entirely new. it was actually conceived in 1990, but the manuscript was set aside and discovered when the author’s former assistant was sorting through Sendak’s papers following his death in 2012.

throughout his career, Maurice Sendak was no stranger to the infamous Banned Books List. several of his stories were deemed too disturbing for his target audience, but that didn’t seem to put a dent in his reputation. only time will tell if the new one, titled Presto & Zesto In Limboland, will be among those controversial classics.

darkness before dawn

Posted in Film, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , on May 2, 2017 by phanteana

hello, gentlemen…the world has been expecting you for some time now. so good of you to drop in.

NBD…it’s National Bookmobile Day!

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , , , on April 12, 2017 by phanteana

spring has sprung, and with it comes one of the best times of the year. no, not Tax Day (unless, of course you actually enjoy filing those)…National Library Week! today in particular, however is a special day: National Bookmobile Day. on this day, we celebrate libraries-on-wheels and the library professionals who provide these on-the-go services to their communities. these are especially crucial to areas where libraries are sparse or non-existent. so if you love your Bookmobile, let it be known!

 

a lending library of coziness

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , , , on March 29, 2017 by phanteana

ever go to the library in the summertime to escape the heat and cool off with a good book, only to be frozen by the air-conditioning? or maybe you’ve ducked in during the winter, but are still shivering from the outside elements. some libraries offer coffee (just don’t drink it near the computers) to perk up their chilly patrons, while others provide free lunches to kids during summer vacation. then there’s the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC, whose staff have taken to lending hand-knitted shawls to researchers spending hours in the library’s reading room. since temperatures have to be kept at a certain level in the reading room to protect the rare books, patrons are prone to feel a bit cold. but the shawls, designed by the room’s Head of Circulation, will help keep them nice and cozy.

the end of overdue fines?

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , on February 24, 2017 by phanteana

come on, admit it…at some point in your life, you’ve forgotten to return a library item (or several) and were issued a late fee. when i was in elementary school, i borrowed a book from the school library and totally forgot to bring it back. after awhile, they said i could keep it and thankfully didn’t charge me. the book in question was this classic piece of childhood nostalgia, which has made appearances on eBay or Amazon from time to time (as other overdue library books have been known to do). i was lucky, but others weren’t and their library privileges were revoked until they redeemed themselves.

the idea of overdue fees began in the US during the early 20th Century, and seems to have stuck among public libraries. the drama of failure to return books still unfolds today, but librarians are beginning to have a change of heart. several states have already done away with overdue fines, because they were counterintuitive to their library’s mission and purpose. not everyone has the money to fork over if they or their kids misplace or lose a book. as a result, circulation within the children’s and young adult sections rose and staff members no longer engage in awkward conflicts with patrons who forget to bring everything back. the executive director of a library district in Colorado even went so far as to announce to patrons: “we trust you.” this is the message all libraries should send to their users.

 

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keep it as long as you like, Bart