Archive for libraries

i heard it through the grave-vine

Posted in Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , on June 3, 2018 by phanteana

libraries & cemeteries have a lot in common: both hold significant historical records (the former in print/electronic form and the latter in markers/stones) and they provide a quiet environment for reflection and study. now imagine these two places were combined into one. that’s what happened when New York’s iconic Greenwood Cemetery collaborated with the remains (womp womp) of the Brooklyn-based Morbid Anatomy Museum for a unique pop-up experience: a library inside a cemetery where patrons can read all about the dearly departed. the museum opened in 2014, and catered to family-friendly crowds & more mature audiences with its eccentric series of lectures (ranging from Taxidermy 101 to a visual presentation on 80’s Goth), exhibits, and activities. but despite its appeal, insufficient funding and the high cost of property space (it is New York, after all) caused it to fold last year. but thanks to the staff at Greenwood, the Morbid Anatomy library has been resurrected to the delight of locals and tourists alike…and just like libraries, Greenwood is very vast so be sure not to accidentally get locked in after hours (not to worry, the groundskeepers have been known to rescue stranded visitors in case they get stuck inside post-sundown).

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yes, Virginia…there is a Melvil Dewey (aka National Library Week 2018)

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , on April 10, 2018 by phanteana

Image may contain: 1 person, text

 

be sure the hand sanitizer is tightly capped. bring an extra cardigan to work just in case.

there may be an app for that, but there’s also a librarian

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , on January 8, 2018 by phanteana

it may be a new year, but those doomsday prophecies about the disappearance of libraries remain the same. as someone who has worked in the private library sector for over a decade, i’ve heard countless reports about how libraries and librarians are a dying breed, similar to that of brick-and-mortar movie rental hubs (believe it or not, they still exist). it’s assumed that people no longer depend on libraries for leisure and education, because they have such easy access to it on the internet. these days, if there’s a question to be answered the immediate action to take is to refer to Google (while it may be faster, it doesn’t replace the satisfaction of speaking to a live human being).

the latest attempt to debunk the “libraries aren’t relevant anymore” myth comes courtesy of Inside Higher Ed, who noted that a previously published article had exaggerated the demise of the librarian as a profession. libraries and archives are still heavily populated by university students (especially during finals week) & public libraries provide a haven for introverts who just want to read in peace and quiet, refuge for the elderly and less fortunate, and they’ll keep your kids out of trouble by providing them with endless hours of video games (sure, they can do that at home but sometimes a change of scenery is necessary for the sake of both parents and offspring). the only possible reason naysayers would continually view libraries as “past their prime” is due to financial constraints. but even with smaller budget plans, there’s still plenty of books to read (or in my case, media to catalog).

youth gone wild

Posted in Library Science stuff, Music with tags , , , , on January 2, 2018 by phanteana

if you’re a parent, you want to impress your kids with all the cool stuff you were into when you were their age. as a librarian, you want to do the same for your youthful audience. sure, libraries have an abundance of video games & YA novels…but what about music? if your branch’s audio selection is lacking in coolness, perhaps it’s time to crank things up a bit…and if you really want to win the award for Librarian (or Parent) Of The Year, you can even tell the kids that the number 1 pick on the list is in the Library of Congress!

body slams and books

Posted in Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , , on December 21, 2017 by phanteana

if you’ve read enough of this blog, then you’re aware of my professional leanings: i’m a media library coordinator with an interest in coding. i even have my own portfolio (but you won’t get to see that just yet, because that would mean revealing my identity…muhahaha!). but enough about me, let’s talk about…the Milwaukee Public Library. why them? because they, like so many other libraries, have found a unique way to entice patrons into spending more time in the stacks…even if it meant rearranging the furniture and computer stations.

 

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a rush and a push and the land is ours (to drive a bookmobile)

Posted in Library Science stuff, Popular Culture with tags , , , on October 25, 2017 by phanteana

the bookmobile is both loved and ridiculed. it brings the joys of reading to people who may not otherwise have access to a library, but it also is prone to parodies. regardless of opinion, it is an invention that has helped libraries gain wider appeal.

while bookmobiles are more commonly associated with suburban and rural areas where libraries are either few and far between, major urban areas are also embracing them. one such city is Los Angeles and if you’re familiar with the layout of L.A., then you know commuting relies heavily on driving…sure, you can get around on the bus or rail (or by bike) but the trips will take far longer (and the L.A. highways are notorious for their congestion, frequently dubbed “Carmageddon“). so why spend 45 minutes driving to a bookstore, when the books can come to you? that’s the idea behind Twenty Stories, an independent bookmobile operating out of a 1987 Chevy van. the founders are a millennial couple from New York who relocated to L.A. last year in search of a literary community. while both cities have a rich amount of writers and bookstores, New York is the polar opposite of Los Angeles when it comes to getting around: despite a round-the-clock public transit system (good), it’s unfortunately prone to overcrowding and intense delays (bad)…so while getting around without a car may be easier, it isn’t always faster. so perhaps Twenty Stories might consider expanding its services in the future, especially since the creators once dwelt in The City That Never Has A Train Running On Time.

 

time to ban some books (again)

Posted in Library Science stuff with tags , , , , , on September 27, 2017 by phanteana

are you still recovering from Banned Books Week 2016? well, get ready for yet another crop of frequently challenged books. and if there’s any literary pieces you think should be included in the list, please post them in the comments!

 

Banned Books Week: Our right to read, September 24-30, 2017