Archive for music libraries

cut from the cloth of greatness

Posted in Music, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , on October 17, 2018 by phanteana

the 90’s were a transitional period in music: glitzy Hair Metal gave way to grimy Grunge, Faith-based singers crossed into Pop territory, Rap artists shed their party-time lyrics in favor of more politically-oriented content & Dinosaurs still roamed the airwaves decades after their big breaks. then, there was Alternative music: a library so vast it encompasses a multitude of genres (and this is only a fraction of it).

among the artists lumped into the Alternative category is Peter Murphy. anyone who has read this blog or knows me IRL is well aware of how devoted i am to him, & that despite forgetting my name (because famous people meet thousands of fans, so i don’t expect him to remember anyone’s name), he recognizes my face whenever he comes through my city and can recall little things here and there (he once complimented my haircut, and on a separate occasion asked me if i was still living in [name of section of city], but i had since moved to another section). his easy-going manner when talking to fans is just part of why i love him. i don’t view him as a celebrity, but rather as a (stunning looking) regular person who just happens to have been blessed with immense talent.

that immense talent landed ex-Bauhaus front man Murphy the honor of a Number 1 hit in 1990, as well as Billboard’s 9th Greatest Alternative Song of All Time (not too shabby), bringing him out of the shadows of Goth Rock & into the dorm rooms of Dr. Martens-wearing art majors (i was one, until i switched to Film Studies). that song, “Cuts You Up“, and its subsequent album Deep, stood apart from other artists receiving radio & MTV play with its moody violin, soul-searching lyrics, and its high-cheek-boned, bleached-blonde singer poised to perfection under the influence of David Bowie (the Godfather of Alternative Music). it was pre-Grunge, post-Glam…whatever you called it, it was a peak point for Modern music in 1990. although Murphy only cracked the US charts a total of 3 times in his 40-year career, “Cuts You Up” still reigns as a prominent piece of his catalog and brings back fond memories for those who remember it well…and considering Murphy is currently touring to mark Bauhaus’ ruby anniversary (and hopefully, that tour will make its way to the States), perhaps his signature song i due for a pop culture boost.

 

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a bearded Peter Murphy and his Bauhaus band-mate David J. Haskins still love their audience 40 years later 

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thrift store jackpot

Posted in Music with tags , , , , , , on August 24, 2017 by phanteana

i’m quite fond of thrift stores. whether it’s in my own city or when i’m travelling, i make it a point to stop in and see the unique treasures for sale ranging from books (old print smell forever!) to clothing. here’s a recent find for a dollar well spent:

 

deep cassette

 

it’s a nice companion piece to the personally autographed CD copy i’ve owned for closed to 20 years (and still plays perfectly). that’s deep.

rock you like a…

Posted in Library Science stuff, Music with tags , , , , , on May 26, 2017 by phanteana

do you have a vast knowledge of music? do you enjoy cataloging library resources and giving tours? are you willing to brave brutal Midwest winters, sticky summer humidity, and swarms of Cleveland Browns fans to get to work everyday? if so, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is looking for a librarian*!

for those about to apply, we salute you.

 

*this posting has been up for quite awhile, so clearly they still haven’t found what they’re looking for.

 

 

last night a DJ saved my mix

Posted in Library Science stuff, Music, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , , on February 8, 2017 by phanteana

did you have stacks of mix-tapes once upon a time? i did. some of them remain in occasional rotation, while others make me want to cringe. a few of these tapes are DJ mixes from the heyday of the US Goth scene in the late 90’s/early 00’s (this may be a cover, but it never gets old), and listening to them makes me yearn for the days before adult responsibilities set in. back then, 7 am was bedtime after a night of dancing. these days, 7 am is equated with the sound of buzzing alarm clocks. the times, they have a-changed.

so what would you do if someone dropped a whole bunch of club mix-tapes off to you…would you chuck them? or, would they serve a purpose? for Jim Hopkins, a San Francisco-based DJ, the choice veered towards the latter. Hopkins has been working on a project called the SF Disco Preservation Society, a non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve the sounds of the SF dance scene from the 70’s through the 90’s. much of the collection has been digitized for future generations, and also serves as a nostalgic reminder for those who remember it well.

perhaps Hopkins’ unique approach to archival preservation might inspire DJ’s from other genres to follow suit. even after the morning alarm goes off, those old Goth mixes help me start my day.

 

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..everyone dressed like Fairuza Balk

 

burnin’ for U(K)

Posted in Music, Popular Culture with tags , , , , , on November 28, 2016 by phanteana

Punk has always been about rebellion and protest against mainstream society, especially in the United Kingdom. there are people who worship the music/lifestyle, and there are those who despise it. but one individual might have taken his disdain for it a little too far: by burning a personal collection valued at nearly 5 million pounds(!), or around $6.25M(!).

so who is this perpetrator? a fellow named Joe Corre, who happens to be the son of the late Malcolm McLaren, the former manager of the Sex Pistols. apparently, Mr. Corre feels strongly that Punk was “never meant to be nostalgic“, and thus is willing to torch a 40-year legacy over his beliefs. Corre has also been slammed by his late father’s former client, John Lydon, who had some choice words for Corre in a recent NME article.

somewhere, the ghost of Sid Vicious is weeping…or plotting revenge…or just passed out.

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the Dischord Records archive project (aka a music nerd’s dream)

Posted in Library Science stuff, Music with tags , , , , , , on September 22, 2016 by phanteana

Washington DC may be the Nation’s Capital, but it’s also home to a long-storied punk and hardcore scene courtesy of Dischord Records. huge stacks of lore have been written about bands like Minor Threat, Bad Brains, and even the humble beginnings of Monica Richards before she became everyone’s favorite Muse, thus providing fans and musicologists with a plethora of information. with that said, Dischord recently posted on its website an internship opportunity that is too good to pass up for current MLIS students or recent graduates. that’s correct…a chance to assist with cataloging, preserving, and creating finding aids for manuscript collections with a legendary independent label. applicants must be local to DC, and have some familiarity with Punk music (though both of these are kind of a given). as far as internships go, this definitely ranks high on the list of awesome ones.

 

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HR would apply for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity (if he were in an MLIS program)

 

master of registries

Posted in Music, Popular Culture with tags , , , on March 27, 2016 by phanteana

the Library of Congress is considered to be the Holy Grail for librarians and archivists. each year, 25 lucky winners are selected to be inducted into the LOC’s National Recording Registry to showcase the diversity of American music from a variety of genres. in order to be included, the recordings must be at least 10 years old and highlight a cultural or historical significance. this year, the LOC chose an album that is not only celebrating its 30th anniversary (does anyone feel old yet?), but has the unbelievable honor of being the first Metal album ever to join this widely-praised institution: Metallica’s Master Of Puppets. now that’s heavy!

the album is a watershed among critics and fans, and even those who aren’t necessarily part of the Metal community praised its quality. its significance is not only found in the shift of musical direction (veering away from the Thrash sound of their early 80’s outputs and focusing more on songwriting abilities), but also for the poignancy of being the last album to feature bassist Cliff Burton, whose death (he was killed when the band’s bus flipped over while driving through Sweden in September 1986) is widely regarded as one of popular music’s most tragic losses. 30 years later, his memory lives on through his fans, the surviving members of Metallica both past and present, and his devoted father Ray who, at 89 years old, remembers him fondly as both musician and son. even the most die-hard Metal fan gets a little misty-eyed listening to this soft-spoken gentleman recount how much he adored Cliff. if he were alive today, he would certainly be pleased.